fbpx

WOMEN'S HEALTH WEBINAR SERIES

What is the Women's Health Webinar Series?

  • 10 webinars – 1 per month for 10 months
  • 10 international experts
  • 10 trending topics
  • A VIP community
  • Easily plan 10 to 12 continuing education credits. There is no course research to do for the next year!

There are two programs available for this web series:

  1. Program 1: For all healthcare professionals (physiotherapists, physiotherapy technologists, kinesiologists, athletic therapists, occupational therapists, chiropractors, osteopaths, nurses, physicians)
  2. Program 2: For pelvic physical therapists

All webinars will be in English and English subtitles will be available live. You will also have access to English and French subtitles a few days after the rebroadcast. The replays will be available until September 1st, 2022.

1. Program 1 = For all healthcare professionals (Program 2 = for pelvic physical therapists - see description following Program 1👇)

BONUS! Microbiome science and perinatal care: why does it matter? by Sinéad Dufour, Physiotherapist, PhD

September 10, 2021 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

You may not realize it, but the cells that make up your body are only about 10% human. The rest of the cells of your body are composed of microorganisms who are continually interacting with your human cells to either keep you vibrant and healthy or sluggish and sickly. The microbiome of the human body is the ecosystem for numerous species of microorganisms. Bacteria, fungi, archaea, viruses, and other microorganisms are what make up the microbiome that covers the inside and outside of your body. These microorganisms serve different purposes but they all work together and with your body to help you operate in the most efficient manner possible.

The microbiome is responsible for aiding in multiple metabolic processes, increasing immunity to a variety of diseases, and has a critical impact on the interaction between your organs. When there is a disruption in the balance between “good” and “bad” microbes or certain microbes are dislocated into inappropriate parts of the body, this is when the disease is given the opportunity to occur.

The perinatal care period is a very important time for the microbiome as there are many factors that modulate the development and function of this ecosystem spanning prenatal, intrapartum and postpartum phases. So, what you do when you are pregnant, birth your baby and engage with your baby in the postpartum period matters. Our understanding of the microbiome and how to minimize disruption to this important health-driving ecosystem has proliferated in the last decade.

All relevant care providers are called to better understand the microbiome and their implications are common practices through the perinatal period, some of which are beneficial and some of which have negative implications for the microbiome.

Course Outline

  • What is the microbiome?
  • Implications of prenatal practices on the microbiome
  • Implications of intrapartum practices on the microbiome
  • Implications of early post-natal practices on the microbiome
  • Breast feeding and microbiome health

Objectives

  • Understanding the microbiome
  • Understanding how to minimize disruption

C-Section Rehab by Katie Kelly, Physiotherapist, MSc

September 24, 2021 at 11 a.m. (Eastern time)

With roughly 30% of North American births occurring via caesarean, this is a patient population that you will encounter as a pelvic health or orthopedic practitioner. Because so many women experience shame, guilt and the feeling that they “took the easy way out” following a C-section, it is important to be armed with the appropriate information and language necessary to help women prepare for this surgery and to recuperate afterwards. A caesarean birth presents its own unique set of challenges for practitioners. Rehabilitation techniques addressing the complications that can occur following a major abdominal surgery while simultaneously acknowledging the challenges associated with early motherhood are necessary for a well-balanced approach to recovery.

Course outline & Objectives

After completing this one hour webinar attendees should have increased knowledge of:

  • Rationale why health practitioners should have training in cesarean specific knowledge
  • Brief overview of Cesarean section surgical techniques
  • The use of abdominal bracing following Cesarean surgery
  • The evidence in support of manual-based treatment techniques for cesarean scar pain and mobility

The role of physiotherapy in multidisciplinary care of women after gynecological malignancy by Marie-Pierre Cyr, Physiotherapist, PhD

October 1st, 2021 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Sexual and pelvic floor dysfunctions are common conditions affecting women who have been treated for gynecological cancer. Recent evidence is supporting the role of physiotherapy in the management of such conditions in cancer survivors. Physiotherapy could therefore be integrated in multidisciplinary cancer care.

Course outline

Coming soon

Objectives

To inform about this treatment option to experts involved in the care of women who have been diagnosed with gynecological malignancy, this conference aims to:

  • Describe physiotherapy as a treatment option to reduce the consequences of gynecological malignancy such as sexual and pelvic floor dysfunctions
  • Review the current level of evidence for physiotherapy to treat sexual and pelvic floor dysfunctions in women after gynecological malignancy
  • Discuss models of care related to physiotherapy among other interventions to improve sexual and pelvic health of women after gynecological malignancy

Gastrointestinal disorders and pelvic floor by Susan C. Clinton, Physiotherapist, PhD, Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapy

November 9, 2021 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

GI disorders of constipation and fecal incontinence involve pelvic floor impairments with disruptions of strength, coordination and inhibition/excitation of neurological reflexes. GI disorders have a complimentary hyposensitive vs. hypersensitive component which will drive the neuromuscular impairment requiring treatment.  This brief introductory topic will discuss the role of the pelvic floor and neuromuscular control in the necessary consideration for the hyposensitive client with constipation and/or fecal incontinence.

Course outline

  • Brief description of the anatomy and neuromuscular components of the anorectal region and the pelvic floor
  • Overview of constipation and fecal incontinence
  • Examination and brief discussion of effective treatment

Objectives

  • Explain the anatomical and neuromuscular components of the anorectal region and the pelvic floor
  • Understand the Rome criterion IV for Constipation and Fecal Incontinence
  • Describe the basic examination of the anal region and pelvic floor
  • Understand the most effective treatment for the hyposensitive client.

Inclusive Care for Gender and Sexual Minorities (providing care to individuals in the LGBTQ+ community, including those undergoing hormonal/surgical transition) by Brianna Durand, Physiotherapist, DPT

December 3, 2021 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Description
Are you unsure about asking a patient their pronouns? Or when and how to do so? Do you find yourself wanting to provide affirming, compassionate care to your LGBTQ+ patients, but don’t quite know what to say. Often, when we are afraid of making a mistake, we choose not to address the topic because we are afraid of causing harm. However, in the medical field, the silence can be just as harmful. In this webinar, you will learn the basic terminology about this population as well as what terms to avoid. You will leave feeling confident asking for and using pronouns. You will have an opportunity to ask all the questions you were afraid to ask- in a safe space and free from judgement. Simply modifying your language to be more inclusive can significantly improve the care you provide as well as the outcomes of your patients.

Course outline:

  • Terminology 101
  • Prevalence
  • Demographics
  • Implicit bias
  • Social determinants of health
  • Sex v. gender
  • Pronouns
  • Deadnaming
  • Language to avoid
  • Microaggressions
  • Actionable items
  • Resources for further learning

Objectives:

After this webinar, attendees will be able to better:

  • Provide compassionate, well-informed, healing care to address patients in their entirety
  • Reframe understanding of sex & gender
  • Increase knowledge of the terminology used by & relating to LGBTQ+ individuals
  • Understand the social, economic, psychological implications on health
  • Lead with professional accountability
  • Dispel common misconceptions
  • Answer questions regarding caring for LGBTQ+ patients 

A biopsychosocial framework for changing pain, pelvic health concerns and athletic performance: TIIPPSS-FC by Teresa Waser, Physiotherapist, MSc

January 21, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

This webinar provides an introduction to the TIIPPSS-FC framework for physical therapists, healthcare providers and fitness professionals who are looking to simplify their assessment and treatment approach with a biopsychosocial lens. Learn how various aspects including tension in the core canister, intrabdominal pressure, postural factors, gut/bladder/symptom irritability, and more can be used to change pain, leaking, prolapse symptoms and even athletic performance parameters.

Walk away inspired with a new perspective!

Course outline

  • Common beliefs to consider
  • Introduction to the TIIPPSS-FC Framework
  • Tension
  • Impact
  • Irritability
  • Posture/Position
  • Pressure
  • Strategy
  • Sensitivity
  • Fatigue
  • Capacity
  • Practical Application
  • Case study

Objectives 

  • Establish understanding of the TIIPPSS-FC framework: what it is and how it can help in various clinical situations and practice settings
  • Understand the various interconnected components of TIIPPSS-FC from a biopsychosocial lens and how we might use them to create change in the experience of pain, pelvic health or performance concerns
  • Consider load management and progressive overload principles when considering fatigue and capacity
  • Identify various factors that may impact sensitivity and dial symptoms up or down
  • Review a case study as an example of the practical application of TIIPPSS-FC

Understanding and coaching the female pelvic floor during high impact activities by Helen Keeble, Physiotherapist

February 18, 2022 at 12:30 p.m. (Eastern time)

Description
Ever wondered how the female pelvic floor responds to lifting heavy? Is lifting heavy good or bad for the pelvic floor? and what about bracing and wearing belts? Have all these questions answered and much more on this information packed hour with Helen Keeble chatting all things weight lifting and pelvic floor. Also learn how to coach women with pelvic floor dysfunction back to lifting heavy.

Course outline

  • Recap of the anatomy of the female pelvic floor and how it responds to the effects of force and pressure
  • Examination of the current literature and research surrounding the pelvic floor and weight lifting
  • Brief discussion on coaching women with pelvic floor dysfunction when weight lifting

Objectives

  • Explain how the female pelvic floor responds to pressure and force when performing optimally
  • Understand how the latest evidence and research helps to guide clinical practise for women who are lifting weights
  • Devise and implement training programmes involving weight lifting for women with pelvic floor dysfunction

Menstrual cycle and athlete performance by Kirsty Elliot-Sale, PhD Exercise Physiology

March 11, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

The menstrual cycle is an important biological rhythm, whereby large cyclic fluctuations in endogenous sex hormones, such as oestrogen and progesterone, are observed. The fairly predictable (and measurable) fluctuations in oestrogen and progesterone across the menstrual cycle create significantly different transient hormonal profiles, which are used to differentiate between menstrual cycle phases. As such, the menstrual cycle is commonly divided into three phases, (1) the early follicular phase, characterised by low oestrogen and progesterone, (2) the ovulatory phase, characterised by high oestrogen and low progesterone, and (3) the mid-luteal phase, characterised by high oestrogen and progesterone. Although the primary function of these hormones is to support reproduction, research has highlighted that the changing concentrations of oestrogen and progesterone across the menstrual cycle, also exert a myriad of diverse and complex effects on multiple physiological systems, including cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic and neuromuscular parameters, which could have subsequent implications for exercise performance. [Source McNuty, Elliott-Sale et al., 2020]

Course outline

  • Brief description of the hormonal changes that occur during the menstrual cycle
  • Overview of the research in this area
  • Examination of the research area and future directions and the application of the current data

Objectives

  • Explain the endocrinology and physiology underpinning the effects of the menstrual cycle on performance
  • Understand the hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle
  • Understand the findings to date in this research area
  • Understand how to use the current findings in practice

Preparing to Push in Birth by Anita Lambert, Physiotherapist, MSc, BKin, NCPT

April 8, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Many pregnant people are not given up to date information or options about pushing during birth. This introductory topic will discuss the pelvic floor and relate to pushing types, timing and positions during birth and strategies to minimize tearing. Understanding how best to support and prepare for clients for pushing can help reduce their fear and increase their confidence about giving birth.

Course outline

  • Brief description of pelvic floor anatomy
  • General overview of stages of labour and cardinal movements of labour
  • Explanation of types, timing and positions for pushing and ways to minimize tearing
  • Supporting clients clinically with options and strategies for pushing

 Objectives

  • Explain the anatomical components of the pelvic floor
  • Understand the stages of labour and cardinal movements during labour
  • Understand how to connect the breath to relax the pelvic floor that can be helpful for pushing
  • Understand types, timing and positions for pushing and perineum support
  • Understanding the most effective way to prepare pregnant clients for pushing during birth

Maternal obesity: exercise and nutrition based interventions for weight management during and following pregnancy by Kirsty Elliot-Sale, PhD Exercise Physiology

May 13, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Women of reproductive age represent a sub-population with one of the highest increases in obesity rates in recent years. This means that many women enter pregnancy already overweight or obese. Moreover, many women gain too much weight during pregnancy, which is called excessive gestational weight gain. This means that some women have a substantial amount of weight to lose in the postpartum period, which many do not achieve. This persistent weight gain can worsen with subsequent pregnancies. Excessive GWG and prolonged postpartum weight retention have been shown to result in an elevated body mass index up to 15 years following childbirth, which is associated with adverse long-term health issues for both mother and child. It is therefore evident that there is an urgent need to investigate antenatal and postnatal weight management strategies and to provide evidence-based advice for exercise and/or nutrition-based interventions.

Course outline

  • Brief description of the causes and consequences of maternal obesity
  • Overview of when it is best to intervene; pre-pregnancy, during pregnancy, following childbirth
  • Overview of how it is best to intervene; exercise, nutrition, or lifestyle (combined) interventions

Objectives

  • Explain the causes and consequences of maternal obesity for both the mother and infant
  • Understand how to approach lifestyle interventions in this population
  • Understand how to use the current findings in practice

Evidence based strategies for dysmenorrhea, endometriosis, bladder pain/interstitial cystitis by Michelle Lyons, PT, MISCP

June 17, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Pelvic pain issues may affect up to 1 in 6 women worldwide – endometriosis alone is thought to affect 10-15% of women globally. This webinar will take an overview of three of the most common diagnoses and examine the evidence for the role of physiotherapy in treatment/management, as well as providing direction for assessment and multi-modal treatment.

Course outline

  • Brief description of the relevant pelvic anatomy
  • Overview of diagnostic and assessment strategies
  • Discussion of evidence based multi-modal  treatment

Objectives

  • Explain the anatomical and neuro-muscular drivers of female pelvic pain
  • Understand the prevalence and the impact of delayed diagnosis
  • Recognise the importance of taking a biopsychosocial approach to managing female pelvic pain, integrating manual therapy, movement strategies with lifestyle interventions such as pain neuroscience, mindfulness and nutrition

2. Program for pelvic physical therapists (only!)

BONUS! Microbiome science and perinatal care: why does it matter? by Sinéad Dufour, Physiotherapist, PhD

September 10, 2021 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Description
You may not realize it, but the cells that make up your body are only about 10% human. The rest of the cells of your body are composed of microorganisms who are continually interacting with your human cells to either keep you vibrant and healthy or sluggish and sickly. The microbiome of the human body is the ecosystem for numerous species of microorganisms. Bacteria, fungi, archaea, viruses, and other microorganisms are what make up the microbiome that covers the inside and outside of your body. These microorganisms serve different purposes but they all work together and with your body to help you operate in the most efficient manner possible.

The microbiome is responsible for aiding in multiple metabolic processes, increasing immunity to a variety of diseases, and has a critical impact on the interaction between your organs. When there is a disruption in the balance between “good” and “bad” microbes or certain microbes are dislocated into inappropriate parts of the body, this is when the disease is given the opportunity to occur.

The perinatal care period is a very important time for the microbiome as there are many factors that modulate the development and function of this ecosystem spanning prenatal, intrapartum and postpartum phases. So, what you do when you are pregnant, birth your baby and engage with your baby in the postpartum period matters. Our understanding of the microbiome and how to minimize disruption to this important health-driving ecosystem has proliferated in the last decade.

All relevant care providers are called to better understand the microbiome and their implications are common practices through the perinatal period, some of which are beneficial and some of which have negative implications for the microbiome.

Course Outline

  • What is the microbiome?
  • Implications of prenatal practices on the microbiome
  • Implications of intrapartum practices on the microbiome
  • Implications of early post-natal practices on the microbiome
  • Breast feeding and microbiome health

Objectives

  • Understanding the microbiome
  • Understanding how to minimize disruption

C-Section Rehab by Katie Kelly, Physiotherapist, MSc

September 24, 2021 at 11 a.m. (Eastern time)

With roughly 30% of North American births occurring via caesarean, this is a patient population that you will encounter as a pelvic health or orthopedic practitioner. Because so many women experience shame, guilt and the feeling that they “took the easy way out” following a C-section, it is important to be armed with the appropriate information and language necessary to help women prepare for this surgery and to recuperate afterwards. A caesarean birth presents its own unique set of challenges for practitioners. Rehabilitation techniques addressing the complications that can occur following a major abdominal surgery while simultaneously acknowledging the challenges associated with early motherhood are necessary for a well-balanced approach to recovery.

Course outline & Objectives

After completing this one hour webinar attendees should have increased knowledge of:

  • Rationale why health practitioners should have training in cesarean specific knowledge
  • Brief overview of Cesarean section surgical techniques
  • The use of abdominal bracing following Cesarean surgery
  • The evidence in support of manual-based treatment techniques for cesarean scar pain and mobility

Physiotherapy for pelvic health after gynecological cancer by Marie-Pierre Cyr, Physiotherapist, PhD

October 8, 2021 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Women treated for gynecological cancer frequently experience chronic pelvic pain and pelvic floor disorders. There is a growing body of evidence supporting the benefits of physiotherapy to alleviate these conditions. However, the assessment and treatment approach may vary from populations without a history of cancer.

Course outline

Coming soon

Objectives

To provide tools to physiotherapists, this conference aims to:

  • Explain the impact of gynecological cancer and its treatment on pelvic health
  • Give insight into the assessment and treatment approach in physiotherapy within the context of gynecological cancer
  • Summarize the current level of evidence for physiotherapy to improve pelvic health after gynecological cancer

Gastrointestinal disorders and pelvic floor by Susan C. Clinton, Physiotherapist, PhD, Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapy

November 9, 2021 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

GI disorders of constipation and fecal incontinence involve pelvic floor impairments with disruptions of strength, coordination and inhibition/excitation of neurological reflexes. GI disorders have a complimentary hyposensitive vs. hypersensitive component which will drive the neuromuscular impairment requiring treatment.  This brief introductory topic will discuss the role of the pelvic floor and neuromuscular control in the necessary consideration for the hyposensitive client with constipation and/or fecal incontinence.

Course outline

  • Brief description of the anatomy and neuromuscular components of the anorectal region and the pelvic floor
  • Overview of constipation and fecal incontinence
  • Examination and brief discussion of effective treatment

Objectives

  • Explain the anatomical and neuromuscular components of the anorectal region and the pelvic floor
  • Understand the Rome criterion IV for Constipation and Fecal Incontinence
  • Describe the basic examination of the anal region and pelvic floor
  • Understand the most effective treatment for the hyposensitive client.

Inclusive Care for Gender and Sexual Minorities (providing care to individuals in the LGBTQ+ community, including those undergoing hormonal/surgical transition) by Brianna Durand, Physiotherapist, DPT

December 3, 2021 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Are you unsure about asking a patient their pronouns? Or when and how to do so? Do you find yourself wanting to provide affirming, compassionate care to your LGBTQ+ patients, but don’t quite know what to say. Often, when we are afraid of making a mistake, we choose not to address the topic because we are afraid of causing harm. However, in the medical field, the silence can be just as harmful. In this webinar, you will learn the basic terminology about this population as well as what terms to avoid. You will leave feeling confident asking for and using pronouns. You will have an opportunity to ask all the questions you were afraid to ask- in a safe space and free from judgement. Simply modifying your language to be more inclusive can significantly improve the care you provide as well as the outcomes of your patients.

 

Course outline:

  • Terminology 101
  • Prevalence
  • Demographics
  • Implicit bias
  • Social determinants of health
  • Sex v. gender
  • Pronouns
  • Deadnaming
  • Language to avoid
  • Microaggressions
  • Actionable items
  • Resources for further learning

Objectives:

After this webinar, attendees will be able to better:

  • Provide compassionate, well-informed, healing care to address patients in their entirety
  • Reframe understanding of sex & gender
  • Increase knowledge of the terminology used by & relating to LGBTQ+ individuals
  • Understand the social, economic, psychological implications on health
  • Lead with professional accountability
  • Dispel common misconceptions
  • Answer questions regarding caring for LGBTQ+ patients 

Inclusive Care for Gender and Sexual Minorities (providing care to individuals in the LGBTQ+ community, including those undergoing hormonal/surgical transition) - Advanced by Brianna Durand, Physiotherapist, DPT

January 14, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

This webinar is the advanced version of the one offered the precedent month, including treatment techniques. However, it is a prerequisite to this one. 

After attending the “LGBTQ+ 101” prerequisite, you will be prepared to dive in to the more nuanced details of affirming care. In this webinar, you will learn about some of the unique medical considerations for this population and not only the biopsychosocial factors. You will be exposed to the many different types of gender affirming surgery and the current research regarding the impacts of hormone replacement therapy. This webinar will leave you with an improved understanding of biological sex as a spectrum rather than a binary and change the way you approach care for *all* of your patients!”

 

Course outline:

  • Intersex conditions
  • Puberty blockers
  • Hormonal transition (masculinizing & feminizing)
  • Surgical transition (vaginoplasty, phalloplasty, top surgery, etc)
  • Chest binding
  • Tucking and packing
  • Pelvic pain in trans masculine patients
  • Cancer risk in trans patients
  • Bone health in trans patients
  • Trans pregnancy 
  • Resources for further learning

Objectives:

After this webinar, attendees will be able to better:

  • Confidently inquire about specific hormone transition related history 
  • Utilize up-to-date and affirming terminology regarding surgical transition
  • Understand the social, economic, psychological implications on health
  • Practice with comfort with clinical interactions based on currently available research
  • Integrate their knowledge of gender affirming surgeries into their care
  • Identify resources to expand their understanding of LGBTQ+ health care

Menstrual cycle and athlete performance by Kirsty Elliot-Sale, PhD Exercise Physiology

March 11, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

The menstrual cycle is an important biological rhythm, whereby large cyclic fluctuations in endogenous sex hormones, such as oestrogen and progesterone, are observed. The fairly predictable (and measurable) fluctuations in oestrogen and progesterone across the menstrual cycle create significantly different transient hormonal profiles, which are used to differentiate between menstrual cycle phases. As such, the menstrual cycle is commonly divided into three phases, (1) the early follicular phase, characterised by low oestrogen and progesterone, (2) the ovulatory phase, characterised by high oestrogen and low progesterone, and (3) the mid-luteal phase, characterised by high oestrogen and progesterone. Although the primary function of these hormones is to support reproduction, research has highlighted that the changing concentrations of oestrogen and progesterone across the menstrual cycle, also exert a myriad of diverse and complex effects on multiple physiological systems, including cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic and neuromuscular parameters, which could have subsequent implications for exercise performance. [Source McNuty, Elliott-Sale et al., 2020]

Course outline

  • Brief description of the hormonal changes that occur during the menstrual cycle
  • Overview of the research in this area
  • Examination of the research area and future directions and the application of the current data

Objectives

  • Explain the endocrinology and physiology underpinning the effects of the menstrual cycle on performance
  • Understand the hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle
  • Understand the findings to date in this research area
  • Understand how to use the current findings in practice

Understanding and treating genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorders using a biopsychosocial approach by Stéphanie Thibault-Gagnon, Physiotherapist, PhD

March 18, 2022 at 13:30 p.m. (Eastern time)

Research shows that genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorders, which include dyspareunia (painful sexual intercourse) and vaginismus (inability to have vaginal penetration), are associated with various biomedical and psychosocial factors. Several factors have been identified which may be involved in initiating and/or perpetuating painful sex and difficulties with vaginal penetrative activities, including repeated vaginal infections, peripheral and central sensitization, pelvic floor muscle impairments, anxiety, pain cognitions and beliefs, partner’s attitudes and behaviours, relationship dynamics, and cultural background. Identifying and addressing the biopsychosocial factors involved for any person with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder is essential for effective treatment.

This presentation will briefly introduce an approach which can be used to identify and address the biopsychosocial factors implicated in genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder to better assess the needs of clients, choose the most suitable treatment approaches, implicate the client’s partner, and refer to the appropriate healthcare professionals when needed.

Course outline

  • Overview of the biopsychosocial factors involved genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorders (including dyspareunia and vaginismus) based on research evidence and clinical experience
  • Brief description of an assessment approach to identify the biopsychosocial factors involved for a person with a genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder
  • Brief discussion of treatment interventions to address different biopsychosocial factors

Objectives

Following the webinar, the participant will be able to:

  • Explain common biopsychosocial factors involved in genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorders
  • Describe the tools which can be used to effectively assess the biopsychosocial factors involved for a given person with a genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder
  • Understand which treatments are most effective for addressing the different biopsychosocial factors

Preparing to push at birth by Anita Lambert, Physiotherapist, MSc PT, BKin, NCPT

April 8, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Many pregnant people are not given up to date information or options about pushing during birth. This introductory topic will discuss the pelvic floor and relate to pushing types, timing and positions during birth and strategies to minimize tearing. Understanding how best to support and prepare for clients for pushing can help reduce their fear and increase their confidence about giving birth.

Course outline

  • Brief description of pelvic floor anatomy
  • General overview of stages of labour and cardinal movements of labour
  • Explanation of types, timing and positions for pushing and ways to minimize tearing
  • Supporting clients clinically with options and strategies for pushing

 Objectives

  • Explain the anatomical components of the pelvic floor
  • Understand the stages of labour and cardinal movements during labour
  • Understand how to connect the breath to relax the pelvic floor that can be helpful for pushing
  • Understand types, timing and positions for pushing and perineum support
  • Understanding the most effective way to prepare pregnant clients for pushing during birth

Maternal obesity: exercise and nutrition based interventions for weight management during and following pregnancy by Kirsty Elliot-Sale, PhD Exercise Physiology

May 13, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Women of reproductive age represent a sub-population with one of the highest increases in obesity rates in recent years. This means that many women enter pregnancy already overweight or obese. Moreover, many women gain too much weight during pregnancy, which is called excessive gestational weight gain. This means that some women have a substantial amount of weight to lose in the postpartum period, which many do not achieve. This persistent weight gain can worsen with subsequent pregnancies. Excessive GWG and prolonged postpartum weight retention have been shown to result in an elevated body mass index up to 15 years following childbirth, which is associated with adverse long-term health issues for both mother and child. It is therefore evident that there is an urgent need to investigate antenatal and postnatal weight management strategies and to provide evidence-based advice for exercise and/or nutrition-based interventions.

Course outline

  • Brief description of the causes and consequences of maternal obesity
  • Overview of when it is best to intervene; pre-pregnancy, during pregnancy, following childbirth
  • Overview of how it is best to intervene; exercise, nutrition, or lifestyle (combined) interventions

Objectives

  • Explain the causes and consequences of maternal obesity for both the mother and infant
  • Understand how to approach lifestyle interventions in this population
  • Understand how to use the current findings in practice

Evidence based strategies for dysmenorrhea, endometriosis, bladder pain/interstitial cystitis by Michelle Lyons, PT, MISCP

June 17, 2022 at 12 p.m. (Eastern time)

Pelvic pain issues may affect up to 1 in 6 women worldwide – endometriosis alone is thought to affect 10-15% of women globally. This webinar will take an overview of three of the most common diagnoses and examine the evidence for the role of physiotherapy in treatment/management, as well as providing direction for assessment and multi-modal treatment.

Course outline

  • Brief description of the relevant pelvic anatomy
  • Overview of diagnostic and assessment strategies
  • Discussion of evidence based multi-modal  treatment

Objectives

  • Explain the anatomical and neuro-muscular drivers of female pelvic pain
  • Understand the prevalence and the impact of delayed diagnosis
  • Recognise the importance of taking a biopsychosocial approach to managing female pelvic pain, integrating manual therapy, movement strategies with lifestyle interventions such as pain neuroscience, mindfulness and nutrition

© 2022 Bia Formations Inc. All rights reserved.

HTML Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com